Accueil International roster Paolo Fresu, A Filetta & Daniele di Bonaventura
Paolo Fresu, A Filetta & Daniele di Bonaventura

Paolo Fresu, A Filetta & Daniele di Bonaventura

Paolo Fresu, A Filetta & Daniele di Bonaventura

Origin : Sardinia & Corsica
Line-up : A Filetta (voices), Paolo Fresu (trumpet, bugle), et Daniele di Bonaventura (bandoneon)
Divers : new repertoire: "Danse, Mémoire, Danse"

Corsicans and Italians, polyphonists and jazzmen, all deep rooted musicians, voice, trumpet and bandoneon contribute to bringing out the ideals but also the dreams of these “cloud princes” by offering a mixed music that belongs to no-one precisely because it belongs to everyone. 


Biography

What could Aimé Césaire, the great poet and playwright, ranked amongst the most influential personalities of the 20th century, an important politician (mayor of Fort-de-France and Member of Parliament for Martinique for many years) educated in the Republic's best schools and Jean Nicoli, a humble school teacher who taught in Upper Senegal (now Mali) at the end of the 1920's before returning to Corsica to become a resistance leader during the Second World War, have in common?

Both were islanders, attached to their homeland, and men who refused: they clearly rejected colonialism and the suffering inflicted on the weak. One was a descendant of African slaves and an ardent defender of the concept of « negritude », the other was revolted by the fate to which Africa's peoples were subjected in the name of colonialism's "progress" and "mission of civilisation". Both loved Africa passionately.

As communists they denounced the evils of capitalism which chews up people and civilisations. When the moment came they committed themselves to fight fascism and Nazism and to tirelessly defend their ideas. "The idea, this importunate fly" Césaire wrote in his "Discourse on Colonialism".

Jean Nicoli, who was executed on the 30th of August 1943 by the fascist occupying forces, left these admirable words to his children: "... At four o'clock I'm going to be shot. Keep before you the image of a happy father and smile proudly in the street and above all, no mourning. There is no mourning for a father who dies as I will die, pure and ruined. I die for Corsica and the party. For mourning you will both wear a beautiful Moor's head (symbol on the Corsican flag) and a big, red carnation- it must always be a Moor's head like no other, because no-one will have the right to wear it like yours."

If we have decided to bring together these two thinkers in our next show, it is simply to remind us, again and again, that behind the grandeur of these men that we celebrate for their commitment and sacrifice, there is the idea for and by which they lived and died: that of a world which is fairer, freer, more respectful of differences, more equitable and with more solidarity.

We have asked contemporary Corsican authors to be at the confluence of thought of these builders who were Nicoli and Césaire, to enlighten us as to their ideological, philosophical but also poetic journey.

Corsicans and Italians, polyphonists and jazzmen, all deep rooted musicians, voice, trumpet and bandoneon contribute to bringing out the ideals but also the dreams of these "cloud princes" by offering a mixed music that belongs to no-one precisely because it belongs to everyone.

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CréditsAgence Oui